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EVERETT, Wash. – Oct. 19, 2021 – When it comes to a food safety crisis like an E.coli outbreak, little restaurant brands have an outsized influence.  

A recent study published in the International Journal of Hospitality Management found that a theoretical crisis at one restaurant made people hesitant to eat at other restaurants even though they were not directly involved in the event.

The negative spillover effect was also greater from the bottom up than the top down, meaning a crisis at a small restaurant chain hurt the big-name brands more.

“This finding shows the power of small apples to spoil the whole barrel,” said Soobin Seo, an assistant professor at Washington State University’s Carson College of Business and lead author on the study. “This is a warning sign. It is not good news for restaurants overall when somebody else is in crisis.”

Photo by WSU Photo Services, 2021

The findings underscore the need for restaurants to be prepared to respond to a crisis, Seo added, whether it is their own or a competitor’s. The restaurant industry is particularly vulnerable to spillover from crises, the authors note, partly because of the perception that restaurants get their ingredients from the same places.

“When people hear about bad news about one automobile company, they can easily buy from another,” Seo said. “But in the restaurant industry, even though the other brands did nothing wrong, customers feel hesitant after an outbreak, and it doesn’t hurt them if they do not go to out to eat for a few days. Crises are psychologically much more influential in when it comes to restaurants, and that is why there are more financial impacts.”

For the study, Seo and co-author SooCheong Jang from Purdue University presented 380 participants with different crisis scenarios. They first read a theoretical news story about an outbreak of a food-borne illness that occurred at either a “high-equity” fast food brand such as McDonald’s or Wendy’s, or a smaller “low-equity” brand such as Carl’s Jr. or Hardee’s. The study used brand names of real restaurants so they would be easily recognizable, but the outbreaks were fictional. The participants were then asked their intention to visit other restaurants that were not involved in the incident.

The researchers found that knowledge of an outbreak at a high-equity, fast food restaurant caused people to be reluctant to go to its direct competitor, so an outbreak at McDonald’s, for example, would cause people to hesitate to visit Wendy’s. However, it did not have much effect on the less well-known restaurants like Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s.

Yet, in the scenarios where a low-equity brand had the outbreak, reaction spilled over to its low- and high-equity competitors. The low-equity brand crisis even impacted those outside their fast food establishment style, such as the casual dining restaurant Outback Steakhouse.

Given the extent of the spillover, Seo advised restaurants to plan their response well ahead of any incident.

“No matter what level of crisis, your responsibility or credibility, it’s always better to act immediately and honestly with the public: to have a proactive strategy to assure the safety of food,” she said.

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Media Contacts:
Soobin Seo, WSU Carson College of Business, soobin.seo@wsu.edu
Sara Zaske, WSU News and Media Relations, 509-335-4846, sara.zaske@wsu.edu

EVERETT, Wash. – October 13, 2021 – This week, two land-grant universities in states where Boeing has a large footprint, Washington and South Carolina, launched a pivotal partnership designed to spur shared knowledge and collaboration among the aerospace giant’s future workforce.

Washington State University (WSU) Everett and South Carolina-based Clemson University formed CATTs (Cougars and Tigers Together) as a joint initiative to better prepare college students for successful careers at Boeing.

The CATTs program kicked off in Everett last week with the arrival of students from Clemson University. They toured Boeing and other advanced manufacturing companies in Snohomish County and work with WSU Everett students designing autonomous cabin disinfection systems for airplanes. Given the recent COVID-19 pandemic, and the potential for future pandemics, rapid and thorough disinfection of airplane cabins is a high priority both for public safety and to manage airline operating costs. The CATTs team will develop a solution that can be deployed during post-flight cleaning that eliminates viral and bacterial contamination and reduces aircraft turnaround time. The project culminates in Spring 2022 when WSU Everett students travel to South Carolina and, along with their Clemson teammates, present their final report to Boeing leaders.

WSU Everett and Clemson undergraduate engineering students collaborate on a airplane disinfectant technology

 “We are proud to support students in the states where many of our employees live and work,” said Craig Bomben, Vice President of Boeing Flight Operations and Test & Evaluation Design Build. “This unique partnership helps facilitate a robust talent pipeline while helping students fulfill their career ambitions.”

Clemson and WSU share collective strengths in engineering education, global reputation, and land-grant history, and are well-positioned for collaboration due to  their close geographic proximity to Boeing’s factories in (Everett, WA and North Charleston, SC). Boeing, which is providing financial support to each school to fund student travel and project expenses, is a large employer of Clemson and WSU graduates.

“At WSU Everett, collaboration is in our DNA,” Chancellor Paul Pitre said. “As we prepare the next generation of aerospace thinkers and leaders – many of whom will work at Boeing – it makes sense to partner and model the kind of creative collaboration our industry partners want.”

“Providing students with opportunities to address real-world challenges through experiential learning is at the core of a Clemson education,” said Provost Bob Jones. “The knowledge and experience these students will gain from the ability to directly interface with Boeing highlight the benefits of industry partnerships in higher education.”

In addition to developing a technical solution, these multidisciplinary teams will develop a business plan and marketing strategy to support product development. Student teams will also engage with younger students (K-12 and college) in their respective communities through various portals to promote STEM education and the value of education.

Media contact:
Alex Pietsch, 206-719-5593
or Randy Bolerjack

PULLMAN, Wash. – Nearly 90% of Washington State University employees are vaccinated against COVID-19 and student levels are even higher, with infection rates involving the Pullman campus, in particular, declining dramatically compared to a year ago.

“Our vaccination rates are high and we know it’s the path that gets us through this pandemic,” said WSU President Kirk Schulz. “With a critical state deadline approaching for our employees, we’ve sought to work through pockets of hesitancy and uncertainty with compassion and understanding but with a firm commitment to making sure we’re doing everything possible to deliver a robust in-person educational experience.”

Under Gov. Jay Inslee’s vaccine mandate, all state employees must be fully vaccinated by Oct. 18 or have an approved exemption for documented medical reasons or sincerely held religious beliefs. Those who don’t meet the requirements will be prohibited from engaging in work for the State of Washington, including public universities.

Although the final state deadline is still more than a week away, preliminary compliance figures are available because WSU employees were required to verify their vaccine status by Oct. 4 in order to be considered fully vaccinated by Oct. 18. Those who sought exemptions were to submit their completed requests by Oct. 4 to provide the university time to evaluate the requests ahead of the state deadline.

Students faced a Sept. 10 deadline for verifying their vaccination status or applying for a medical or religious exemption. Those who fail to comply will be prohibited from enrolling for spring semester.

Vaccination rates

Of the approximately 10,000 full- and part-time WSU employees systemwide, 88% were fully or partially vaccinated as of Oct. 5. Verification efforts are continuing.

For students who have submitted documentation, reported vaccination rates at each of WSU’s five physical campuses are more than 95%. The Pullman and Spokane campuses top the list at 98% each. Most students have either reported their vaccination status or requested an exemption, though percentages vary by campus and are still growing as compliance efforts continue.

Detailed figures for each campus can be found online.

Medical and religious exemptions

More than 1,250 requests for medical and religious exemptions have been made by WSU students, faculty and staff. So far, nearly 800 have been approved and the review process is continuing. Final numbers will be available after Oct. 18.

The requests for religious exemptions are evaluated in a “blind” review process, meaning the identities of the individuals requesting exemptions are unknown to the members of the review committee except in instances when additional information is needed through follow-up contact. Separate review committees were created for students and employees.

A panel of faculty and staff from all WSU campuses with expertise in religions, diverse backgrounds, and legal accommodations makes up the committee reviewing student requests.

Employee religious requests are reviewed by a committee consisting of a team from WSU’s Human Resource Services as well as the university’s Office of Civil Rights and Compliance. Employee medical exemption requests are considered by the university’s Disability Services team, which normally handles medical-related leave and accommodation requests.

The Washington Attorney General’s Office is being consulted on criteria WSU is using to decide the exemption requests and providing legal advice to both committees as needed.

Those who requested exemptions were asked to provide supporting information.

For employees, the exemption requests go through a two-step process. The first is the blind review. Then, if an exemption is approved, the request moves to a separate accommodation review step where a determination is made whether the unvaccinated employee will be able to perform their duties without risking the health and safety of the community.

An appeals process is in place for students. Employees are provided the opportunity to supply additional information before final decisions are made.

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Media contact: Phil Weiler, vice president for marketing and communications, 509-595-1708, phil.weiler@wsu.edu

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application officially opened on Oct. 1.

For many college students, the FAFSA form is one of the most important forms to fill out to receive financial aid, including scholarships, grants, work-study and loans. All students are encouraged to apply — even if you don’t think you’re eligible.

Here’s what you should know about filling out the FAFSA form this year.

FILING ONLINE

Apply online at fafsa.gov.

WHAT DOCUMENTS WILL I NEED?

Once you’ve created your online ID, it’s time to gather all your necessary documents.

  • • Your Social Security number and your parents’ Social Security numbers if you’re a dependent
  • • Driver’s license number if you have one
  • • If not a U.S. citizen, have your permanent resident card handy
  • • Your 2020 federal tax information for yourself, your spouse if married, and your parents if a dependent
  • • Any records of untaxed income like child support, interest income and veteran noneducation benefits
  • • Information on cash, which includes savings and checking account balances and investments

DO I HAVE TO LIST THE SCHOOLS I WANT TO ATTEND?

Yes, you should list any school you plan on applying to or have already applied to — even if you haven’t been accepted yet. Washington State University’s FAFSA code is 003800. That number is the same at every campus in the WSU system.

In the form, you must list at least one school that will receive your information, and the schools you list will use your FAFSA information to determine how much aid you could receive.

DO I HAVE TO INCLUDE MY PARENTS’ INFORMATION?

If you’re a dependent student, yes.

You must provide information on both your parents whether or not they are married to each other if they live together. If your legal parent is widowed or never married, then answer questions about that parent. If your parents are divorced or separated and do not live together, you must answer questions about the parent with whom you lived over the past 12 months. If you lived with both parents the same amount of time, provide information about the parent who provided more financial support. For those who have stepparents married to their legal parent, you must provide information on them as well. If you don’t live with any parent, you must still provide information about them.

WHAT IF I’M UNABLE TO PROVIDE MY PARENTS’ INFORMATION?

If you can’t provide parent information because of circumstances like your parents are incarcerated, you have left home because of an abusive environment or don’t know where your parents are, you can still fill out the form.

However, your form won’t be fully processed and you will not receive an Expected Family Contribution and you must contact your WSU’s financial aid office. You should also gather as much information as possible regarding your situation.

WSU’s financial aid staff will work with you to determine how much aid you can get.

WHAT IF MY FAMILY’S FINANCIAL SITUATION HAS CHANGED SINCE DOING OUR TAXES?

Some FAFSA applicants may have recent financial changes because of the pandemic or other reasons. If you find yourself in this situation, complete and submit the FAFSA form like normal, then contact the WSU financial aid office to discuss how your situation has changed. The WSU financial aid team may be able to adjust your financial aid award based on your family’s current income.

WHAT ARE THE DEADLINES TO FILL OUT THE FORM?

Submit the FAFSA as soon as possible. The form opens on Oct. 1, and the federal deadline is June 30.

However, WSU has a Jan. 31 deadline for the general scholarship application, so it’s always best to complete it as soon as possible

To all WSU Everett employees,

      As a reminder, all WSU employees, including faculty, administrative professionals, classified staff, temporary hourly (both student and non-student), and graduate assistants, public affiliates, academic affiliates, and contingent workers regardless of work location must verify their vaccination status in Workday. All employees must be fully vaccinated or have obtained a medical or religious exemption by October 18, 2021.

      The vaccination verification requirement supersedes the previous vaccination declaration process in Workday.

      Employees must complete and supervisors must validate, the COVID-19 Vaccination Verification process in Workday confirming completion of the COVID-19 vaccine regimen or employees are to file their completed request for a medical or religious exemption by Oct. 4, 2021 — TODAY!

      The COVID-19 vaccination is a condition of employment. Employees, who are not fully vaccinated or do not obtain a medical or religious exemption, will be prohibited from engaging in work after Oct. 18, 2021.

      Vaccination verification information, the Workday verification and exemption processes, and frequently asked questions are available on the HRS website at hrs.wsu.edu/covid-19/vax-verification.

      HRS sent a direct communication to WSU employees on Sept. 1, 2021, outlining the requirements of the mandate.

      HRS will offer informational sessions surrounding the COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement during the month of September. Enroll in an upcoming session through the HRS Employee Training System here.

      Employee questions may be directed to contact hrs.

      Student and non-employee questions to covid-19.info@wsu.edu.

      Go Cougs!

Paul Pitre, Chancellor
Washington State University Everett

Campuses, alongside several colleges and departments are slated to hold virtual town halls throughout the fall semester, beginning this week with WSU Everett.

The traditional annual series provides faculty, staff and students throughout the WSU system with the opportunity to hear from and engage with university leaders.

The first town hall is set for the Everett campus and will begin at 1 p.m. Sept. 8. As with all of this year’s town halls, the event will be broadcast as a Zoom webinar.

New format

This year’s event includes a change in the traditional format. In advance of the scheduled town halls, participants are asked to view a 20-minute recorded presentation featuring WSU President Kirk Schulz and Provost and Executive Vice President and Pullman Chancellor Designate Elizabeth Chilton sharing WSU’s significant advancements, achievements and developments made by the university in the last year.

The launch of the new Workday system as well as updates on WSU’s fiscal health, enrollment and philanthropy are discussed. There’s also an overview of the university’s expanding research portfolio and its efforts to better meet diversity, equity and inclusion needs. WSU efforts to manage budget and other challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic also are highlighted.

Viewers also will notice the video, embedded below, kicks off the with WSU’s new commercial, which will be featured during televised sporting events on the PAC-12 network.

By providing the recorded WSU system overview for viewing in advance, it allows more time to focus on topics of greatest interest to the campus, college or department being hosted at each specific town hall. It also provides more time for questions and answers.

Members of the WSU community have the opportunity to submit questions ahead of each town hall by filling out an online form.

WSU Spokane will host town halls for each of its three colleges as well as a general event for the entire campus community. More details will be announced prior to the event. WSU Vancouver will also notify its community of the time of its town hall in the near future.

To all our Cougar students, faculty, and staff: welcome back!

           Washington State University Everett is excited to offer in-person learning this Fall Semester, which begins on Aug. 23. Week of Welcome is a week-long series that combines academic and social programming to help new and returning students kick off the new academic year.

           I know you have big plans for your future and earning your bachelor’s degree is more important than ever to that future. We are here with you as you earn the academic credentials and gain the professional experience you need to launch that future.

           As you prepare to join us on campus, here are five important action items to take care of before the first day of classes:

Vaccinations

            Washington State University can offer in-person classes in large part because of the widespread, cost-free availability and proven efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines, which WSU is requiring for all students, faculty, and staff. Exemptions can be requested for medical and non-medical reasons. For those without exemptions, we each have an obligation to serve the public good and promote the health and safety of the communities it serves by getting vaccinated.

           WSU Everett will host a public Back-to-School COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic with Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson on the first day of classes, Aug. 23. A second-dose clinic will take place on campus on Sept. 13. Appointments are recommended, but not required. Pre-registration can be found at these links for Aug. 23 and Sept. 13. Those ages 12-17 must be accompanied by an adult parent/guardian.

           WSU Everett students may now access the Cougar Health Services Patient Portal to submit proof of vaccination or file an exemption. This process must be completed by Sept. 10. This means that by Sept. 10 students must have either provided proof of COVID-19 vaccination or filed an exemption. After any of the three currently approved vaccines receive full FDA approval, personal/philosophical exemptions will no longer be accepted. Students will have 45 days following the approval date to provide proof of vaccination (or initiation of vaccination) or file a medical or religious exemption. Upon FDA approval, the updated process for filing a new medical or religious exemption will be provided. Questions about the vaccine portal, vaccines or exemptions may be directed to cougarhealth@wsu.edu.

UPDATE: Federal regulators granted full approval to the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine on Monday, Aug. 23. Students now have until Oct. 18 to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination (or that they have initiated vaccination), or file a medical or religious exemption in the Cougar Health Services Patient Portal.

           Employee declarations of vaccination status are due in Workday by Aug. 23. All WSU employees are required to be fully vaccinated by Oct. 18. No personal or philosophical exemption will be allowed.

Masking

           According to the Aug. 10 order by the Snohomish Health District and Aug. 18 announcement by Governor Jay Inslee, all persons five years and older must wear a mask indoors, regardless of vaccination status. Snohomish County’s order took effect Thursday, Aug. 12, and the mandate applies to all WSU facilities in Snohomish County. The Washington state order takes effect Aug. 23 and has the same effect: All members of our Cougar community will be required to wear a mask on campus while these masking directives are in place.

Campus Safety Alerts

            Please register for Rave Emergency Alerts. These text/email alerts cover emergency situations at Everett Community College (EvCC). WSU Everett is located on the EvCC campus, so these alerts apply to WSU Everett. Click ‘Register’ in the upper-right quadrant. An online identification from WSU or EvCC is not required.

Parking

           Parking permits are now available to purchase. The permits are good from now through December. Everyone driving to campus should have either a fall parking pass or an individual day pass, purchased from the parking kiosk between WSU Everett and EvCC’s AMTEC building. Visit everett.wsu.edu/parking-permits for your guide to purchasing your parking permit.

Patience

            We are in this together. Let me say that again: we are in this together. Guidance from the Centers for Disease Control, the state of Washington, and Snohomish County will change as we continue to operate within this pandemic. Please exercise patience generously as we apply those changes to our academic operations.

Go Cougs!

Dr. Paul Pitre, Chancellor
WSU Everett & Everett University Center

#WSUTogether

EVERETT, Wash. – Aug. 19, 2021 – Washington State University Everett will host a public Back-to-School COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic with Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson on the first day of classes, Aug. 23. A second-dose clinic will take place on campus on Sept. 13.

Operated by the Snohomish Health District, these Back-to-School COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics are open to the public. Appointments are recommended, but not required. Pre-registration can be found at these links for Aug. 23 and Sept. 13. Those ages 12-17 must be accompanied by an adult parent/guardian.

WSU will return to in-person operations and classes, based on Gov. Jay Inslee’s higher education proclamation. This is in large part because of the widespread, cost-free availability and proven efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines, which WSU is requiring for all students, faculty and staff. Exemptions can be requested for medical and non-medical reasons.

“COVID-19 vaccines are free, safe and effective. Vaccination is our way out of this pandemic, and Washington State University is doing its part to ensure our community is safe,” WSU Everett chancellor Paul Pitre said.

According to the Aug. 10 order by the Snohomish Health District and Aug. 18 announcement by Governor Jay Inslee, all persons five years and older must wear a mask indoors, regardless of vaccination status. Snohomish County’s order took effect Thursday, Aug. 12, and the mandate applies to all WSU facilities in Snohomish County. The Washington state order takes effect Aug. 23 and has the same effect: All members of our Cougar community will be required to wear a mask on campus while these masking directives are in place.

WSU Everett students may now access the Cougar Health Services Patient Portal to submit proof of vaccination or file an exemption. This process must be completed by Sept. 10. This means that by Sept. 10 students must have either provided proof of COVID-19 vaccination or filed an exemption. After any of the three currently approved vaccines receive full FDA approval, personal/philosophical exemptions will no longer be accepted. Students will have 45 days following the approval date to provide proof of vaccination (or initiation of vaccination) or file a medical or religious exemption. Upon FDA approval, the updated process for filing a new medical or religious exemption will be provided. Questions about the vaccine portal, vaccines or exemptions may be directed to cougarhealth@wsu.edu.

Media Contact: Randy Bolerjack

EVERETT, Wash. – August 4, 2021 – Girls Discover STEM is a free event this October 30 at Washington State University Everett, designed to increase interest in engineering among 11th and 12th grade female students. The event is funded by a grant from the American Association of University Women.

Youth will experience hands-on engineering and scientific activities while encountering challenges that engage them with specific engineering and science disciplines; all assisted by current WSU Everett student mentors and WSU Everett faculty who will work with them through each session.

  • Date: Saturday, October 30, 2021
  • Time: 9:00 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.
  • Location: WSU Everett, 915 N Broadway Everett, WA 98201
  • Cost: Free!

Registration is coming soon! To be notified when registration opens, email everett.admission@wsu.edu

Claire Jackson

Hometown: Bellingham, WA
College: Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture
Major: Mechanical Engineering
Minor: Electrical Engineering

“In engineering, coursework is frequently heavily focused on technical aspects of how things function. At WSU Everett, there is also an emphasis on soft skills like communications, writing, leadership, and problem solving within a group dynamic.”

Claire Jackson, Class of 2021 Mechanical Engineering, Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

What sparked your passion for engineering?

Chancellor Pitre and Claire Jackson at the Drive Thru Spring 2021 Commencement Celebration.

In high school, I was fascinated by the laws and equations developed to govern nature and mathematics. I felt so happy after putting all the pieces together to complete a multi-page problem, or when I connected a concept I was taught in class to explain something I had experienced personally.

The last six weeks of high school I led a class project investigating the top ten innovations of prosthetics. It sparked my interest in robotics, the complex motions these prosthetics were able to achieve with electrical signals stimulated by nerves. Specific signals corresponding to mechanical movements allowing for the function of the prosthetic.

I was drawn specifically to mechanical engineering because of the diverse areas I could pursue after completing my degree. With a degree in mechanical engineering, I can work in medical applications, aerospace, manufacturing, construction, and so much more. 

At WSU Everett, there is an exciting integration of mechanical, electrical, and software engineering, which is what lead me to major in mechanical engineering and minor in electrical engineering. When working with robotics mechanical, electrical, and software applications tie so closely together to execute an objective.

Describe your new job at L3Harris Technologies?

The summer before my senior year at WSU Everett I had the opportunity to tour NASA’s Goldstone Deep Space Network where I learned about the significance of the Deep Space Network and significant milestones of NASA. Exploring the compound in person and interacting with engineers on site was an experience that accelerated my interest in space and a desire to work in the aerospace industry. I’m fortunate to be able to learn about space systems through my new role as a test engineer in the Space and Airborne Systems department at L3Harris Technologies in Palm Bay, FL.

Right now, I’m working to complete environmental testing in the Space and Airborne Systems division to verify functionality of an avionic system component during a variety of environmental conditions. As a test engineer, I verify the design by cycling it through a variety of tests to simulate expected extreme conditions to ensure the system will continue to function. To conduct these tests and communicate with the technology, there are a variety of software and programming knowledge applied to generate and understand this information. Within the units there are complex electrical and mechanical systems I must understand to be able to design and conduct testing as well as diagnosing problems and errors I encounter during testing. 

The Experimental Design (ME 406) course at WSU Everett was specifically relevant. We focused on preparing, conducting, and analyzing an experiment as if we were completing these tasks for a company. The key takeaway from this course is the interaction we had with the stakeholders of the fictional companies generated by the assigned prompt. We received feedback and changes to testing procedures, test plans, presentations, and various interactions with the fictional company. I use all of that experience now on behalf of L3Harris Technologies. The exposure Washington State University offered us as students and the direct engagement in my courses at WSU Everett gave me a foundation in the testing process and procedures I see professionally.

Claire pictured bottom right with fellow student ambassadors.

 

How did student organizations shape your experience at WSU Everett?

I was involved in The Associated Students of Washington State University Everett (ASWSUE), first as a senator and secretary, and was later elected ASWSUE President during my third year at WSU Everett. For two years I served as a Student Ambassador, which allowed me to connect with incoming and future students, share my experience, and even provide tours of the campus. I was also a member of Society of Women Engineers (SWE), where I assisted in planning events like Future Engineers Day.

 

Your work was recognized with the President’s Award for Leadership. How cool was that and what advice would you give #EverCougs looking for leadership opportunities on campus?

My selection for the President’s Award for Leadership was based on my role and work as ASWSUE president, coupled with my involvement in other organizations on campus. I am honored to be a 2021 recipient of the award and for the acknowledgement of my hard work and impact on our Everett campus. As a student, I cherished my experiences in several student organizations. They truly enhanced my experience at WSU Everett. I met many of my friends because I was engaged, and had opportunities to network with local professionals, attend the National SWE Conference, and participate in community engagement.

In engineering, coursework is frequently heavily focused on technical aspects of how things function. At WSU Everett, there is also an emphasis on soft skills like communications, writing, leadership, and problem solving within a group dynamic.

Something that encouraged me to stay involved is that everyone graduating with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at WSU has the same, ABET accredited-coursework. So, I actively sought leadership opportunities within organizations to help set me apart. The result was a greater ability to really know my peers and to network with students from other majors. The network I established at WSU Everett created study groups, academic support, and plenty of great experiences outside of school.

Current and future #EverCougs should absolutely make the time to participate in student organizations and look for leadership opportunities around campus. Your involvement on campus provides great opportunities to build your own network, develop your soft skills, and set you apart after graduation.